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David Martinez, PhD

Free Online Lecture – The Origin of Our Extinction: The 1851 Yellow Fever Epidemic and the Hia Ced O’odham with David Martinez, PhD

The Origin of Our Extinction: The 1851 Yellow Fever Epidemic and the Hia Ced O’odham with David Martinez, PhD

Amerind Free Online Lecture

The Origin of Our Extinction: The 1851 Yellow Fever Epidemic and the Hia Ced O’odham with David Martinez, PhD

Saturday, January 29, 2022, 11:00 am – Arizona Time

What became of the people that Spanish explorers called “Areneños” or “Sand people”? After the United States appropriated the New Mexico Territory–first by treaty (1846), then by purchase (1854)–references to the people known for their “sand food” and their “tinajas” disappeared from the historical record. Supposedly, the Sand people, who call themselves Hia-Ced O’odham, succumbed to a yellow fever epidemic in 1851. Supposedly, which means to assume or believe, but not necessarily know for sure. Which begs the question, what do the Hia-Ced O’odham have to say about this? What David Martínez (Akimel O’odham/Hia Ced O’odham) will present is his research on the “extinction” and revitalization of the Hia-Ced O’odham, which is a part of a book he is writing titled The Resilient History of the Hia Ced O’odham: O’odham Sovereignty During the American Era, 1850-2015.

David Martinez, PhD (Akimel O’odham/Hia Ced O’odham/Mexican) is an associate professor of American Indian Studies at Arizona State University and the author of Dakota Philosopher: Charles Eastman and American Indian Thought (Minnesota Historical Society Press, 2009), editor of The American Indian Intellectual Tradition: An Anthology of Writings from 1772 to 1972 (Cornell University Press, 2011), and author of Life of the Indigenous Mind: Vine Deloria Jr and the Birth of the Red Power Movement (University of Nebraska Press, 2019). His publications appear in, among other venues, the American Indian Quarterly, the American Indian Culture and Research Journal, Studies in American Indian Literatures, and Journal of the Southwest. His areas of concentration are American Indian intellectual and political history, contemporary American Indian art and aesthetics, and O’odham culture and history.

This online program is free, but space is limited. To register visit: https://bit.ly/AmerindOnline012922

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Date

Jan 29 2022

Time

11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Cost

Free

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