Exhibits

March 17, 2020 through December 31, 2020

Duane Maktima and Eric Kaldahl, Curators

Singing My Song: The Art of Duane Maktima, a new exhibit by Duane Maktima (Laguna Pueblo/Hopi)

This is a retrospective exhibition on the artistic career of Duane Maktima (Laguna Pueblo/Hopi), master jeweler and metalsmith. Duane Maktima is an award winning jeweler with nearly 40 years as a working artist. In addition to selling in the best galleries, his pieces are held by several museums, including Amerind’s. Learn more about Duane’s life, career, and development into a nationally recognized jewelry designer, artist, and mentor.

February 8, 2020 through January 31, 2021

Eric Kaldahl, Curator

Siki Yoka, the art of Gabriel Ayala (Yoeme)

A member of the Yaqui people of Southern Arizona, guitarist Gabriel Ayala is a classically trained musician, composer and multi- dimensional artist. In October 2017, Gabriel began creating ledger art—a deeply personal and contemporary way of infusing his cultural traditions of storytelling through visual art. The new expression now numbers more than 150 pieces. Gabriel’s work showcases moments in history to share and educate people on the travesties that have occurred to Indigenous people who have been silenced for far too long. Gabriel serves as an advocate for education for all youth. Gabriel believes in leading our children in the right direction through his philosophy, “Love your children, Honor your elders, and Respect your women.” 

Permanent Exhibit

Eric Kaldahl, Curator

American Art Form: A Century of A:shiwi (Zuni) and Diné (Navajo) Jewelry

Zuni and Navajo jewelers create some of the most distinctive and beautiful jewelry in the world. Amerind is the proud home of a newly donated jewelry collection built over three generations, from the late nineteenth to the late twentieth century, which includes thousands of pieces by hundreds of artists. This exhibit showcases the history and development of this jewelry and the artists who made these remarkable pieces and put their art form on the world stage.

Permanent Exhibit

Eric Kaldahl, Curator

Without Borders: The Deep History of Paquimé (Bilingual Exhibit)

Visitors can walk through this exhibit, inspired by the architecture of Paquimé, and explore sixty years of research in Chihuahua, Mexico. Paquimé was one of the most socially, politically, and ceremonially important towns in the region. It grew into a leading community in northern Mexico in the late AD 1200s and flourished through the end of the AD 1400s. Home to some of the most remarkable architecture, civil engineering, and ceramic artistry in the region—the ancient town has been designed by the United Nations as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Partially funded by Arizona Humanities, The Robert J. Wick Family Foundation, and the Community Foundation for Southern Arizona.

Permanent Exhibit

Eric Kaldahl, Curator

Fleet of Foot: Indigenous Running and Games from Ancient Times to Today

Among all the people of the world, running and games are universal. Across cultures and traditions, sports and running are universal activities that can help us relate to one another. In the differences among our sports practices, we gain new insights into the ways of other communities. This exhibit considers running and running sports among the Indigenous communities of the southwestern US and northwestern Mexico. Partially funded by Arizona Humanities.

Permanent Exhibit

Eric Kaldahl, Curator

Indigenous Water/Ways

The Indigenous peoples of the southwestern US and northwestern Mexico treasure water in all its forms. This exhibit showcases Amerind pottery, baskets, jewelry, weavings, wood, shell, and antler carvings with water designs and motfis.Visitors will also learn about the way Indigenous farmers used water and engineered the land to nourish their crops.

Permanent Exhibit

Eric Kaldahl, Curator

A Singular Treasure: The Katsikodi Story Robe

Visitors can view an elk hide painted with scenes of hunters, singers, and dancers, created by the Eastern Shoshone artist Katsikodi. He is believed to have been born inthe 1860s and passed away around 1912. Over 20 of his distinctive painted robes have survived the forces of history, largely now preserved in museum collections like Amerind’s. Friends of Western Art supported the conservation of this elk hide.

Permanent Exhibit

Eric Kaldahl, Curator

Ma Fulton’s FF Ranch

Amerind’s founders Rose Hayden Fulton (1881-1968) and William Shirley Fulton (1880-1964) moved to Arizona in 1930. Mrs. Fulton, affectionately known as Ma Fulton, had a ranch operation where she raised and trained some of the finest quarter horses in the United States. Photographs of her horses, ranch hands, and operations are on exhibit along with her prize winning ribbons and trophies.

Permanent Exhibit

Charles Di Peso, Anne Woosley, Allan McIntyre, John Ware, Carol Charnley, and Eric Kaldahl, Curators

The Pine Study

The Pine Study was installed on the occasion of Mr. Fulton’s 80th birthday in the year 1960. The wood paneling and furnishings came from the Fulton family home in Connecticut. Many of Mr. Fulton’s personal effects are found in this exhibit. The paintings on the wall were done by family members and friends. The Pine Study served as Mr. Fulton’s office for the last years of his life.

Permanent Exhibit

John Ware and Carol Charnley, Curators

Images in Time

Built in 1939, the museum building’s main gallery houses artistic treasures created by Indigenous artists from the Arctic to Mexico. Many of the pieces were made during the late nineteenth and first half of the twentieth century. Visitors will learn about the amazing diversity of Indigenous cultures found throughout North America.

Permanent Exhibit

John Ware and Carol Charnley, Curators​

Apache People and History

The Chiricahua Apache people’s history in southeastern Arizona is rich and complex. Visitors will have an overview of the many Indigenous groups who speak the Apache language, and learn about the history of the Chiricahua Apache people specifically.

Permanent Exhibit

John Ware, Curator

Indigenous Dolls

In the museum building entryway, your little ones will find a great selection of Indigenous dolls, lovingly made by parents and grandparents from all across America.

Permanent Exhibit

Carol Charnley and Ron Bridgemon, Jr., Curators

The Potters of Mata Ortiz

Potters from the Mexican town of Mata Ortiz in Chihuahua, Mexico, were inspired by the ancient potters of Paquimé creating beautiful reproductions of that ancient craft. They then began new pottery traditions with finely painted and incised pottery in new shapes and styles. This exhibit shows how these potters are inspired by the past, but are creating new traditions for the future.

Permanent Exhibit

Carol Charnley, Curator

Diné Arts

Known for their weaving and silver work, Diné woven rugs, weaving tools, silversmithing tools, and other arts are found at several locations on the museum’s second floor.

Permanent Exhibit

Anne Woosley and Allan McIntyre, Curators​

Hallway of Time

Connecting the 1939 and 1950 wings of the Amerind museum building, this hallway lets visitors peer into the archaeology of the American Southwest. Visitors will learn about the most ancient human tools found in Arizona used some 13,000 years ago. Here to people will learn about the most well studied farming cultures of the America Southwest: Huhugam (Hohokam), Mogollon, and Ancestral Pueblo peoples. These farming communities flourished some two thousand years and their descendants still call this region home.

Permanent Exhibit

Anne Woosley and Allan McIntyre, Curators​

Spanish Colonial and Mexican Religious Art

Amerind sits on land that Indigenous people have called home for 13,000 years. In historic times, the governments of Spain, Mexico, and the United States have exercised their sovereignty over the region. This exhibit displays the religious arts of colonial Spain, Mexico, and more contemporary pieces rooted in the Spanish colonial tradition.

Permanent Exhibit

Anne Woosley and Allan McIntyre, Curators​

North American Indigenous Arts

The Amerind is home to the arts of Indigenous people from across North America. Now on exhibit are examples of cradleboards from many Indigenous communities. These cradleboards show the love and care of their makers for their children. Also on exhibit are personal accessories and clothing adorned with porcupine quillwork and beadwork.

Permanent Exhibit

Anne Woosley and Allan McIntyre, Curators​

Yesterday's Amerind

This small enclosed room gives visitors of sense of Amerind museum history. From 1936 until the 1980s, the Amerind was closed to the public. To see its private collections, visitors had to call for an appointment. This exhibit gives today’s visitors a sense of how Amerind’s collection was displayed in the early years of our museum’s history.

Permanent Exhibit

Hopi Katsina Carvings and Hopi Plaques

Forthcoming

Eric Kaldahl, Curator

Amerind - A Legacy of Discovery

For over 80 years, Amerind has conducted archaeological investigations. This exhibit highlights the discoveries made by Amerind’s founder William Shirley Fulton and Amerind’s accomplished staff of archaeological scholars, including Dr. Charles C. Di Peso. Through ancient objects and photographs, visitors will learn about the people of southern Arizona, southern New Mexico, and northern Mexico.